Serbia’s Education Ministry has instructed the teachers of the country’s secondary schools and pre-school institutions to add to their curriculums materials on sexual abuse.

Many sociologists see this as an attempt to instill in the younger generation knowledge about LGBT lifestyles, which flies in the face of the traditional family values.

Apart from materials about sexual violence, the program prepared by the local Incest Trauma Center NGO also contains instructions on the so-called “French kiss” and offers a detailed description of oral and anal sex, the use of condoms by lesbians among other things.

“There is nothing wrong about telling children how to avoid sexual abuse, but there are things here that neither I nor most of my colleagues can agree with,” prominent psychiatrist Zoran Milivojevic said in an interview with Sputnik Serbia.

He added that he doesn’t like it when a project like this is being forced on the country’s school system without any prior public discussion. He also doubts that ministry officials have read the entire 400-page document in the first place.

“If you want to impose a certain system of views on someone, doing this with kids is the easiest way to go. If a child accepts these ideas, then 20 years from now society will no longer be the same again,” Milivojevic warned.

He noted that there are certain groups of people, whom he calls ‘the children’s rights industry,’ who are pushing ahead with ideas that meet their own interests.

“The bottom line is that children are victims of their abusive parents and, therefore, should be saved. This often results in family breakups because people are afraid to interfere because if they do they risk being branded as homophobes and fascists,” Dr. Milivojevic observed.

He added that unstable societies are easier to manipulate, that’s why Serbia should avoid mechanically emulating new ideas and methods without their prior critical evaluation.

“Otherwise you risk falling victim to social engineering techniques, which is probably what the people who finance them really have in mind,” he warned.

His opinion was fully echoed by sociologist Slobodan Antonic. “It makes no sense teaching three-year-olds who don’t know that the word ‘touch’ can have a sexual connotation. As a result, they can tell anyone, including their parents, something like “my body belongs to me,” Antonic noted.

He fears that what is happening now is an attempt to “sexualize” children, to fast-track them into the adult world of sexuality and even pathology.

“Today they can tell them about oral and anal sex, but tomorrow they could start telling them what sadomasochism, gang bangs, swinging and other forms of ‘normal sexual activity’ which our ministry believes is the sole concern of people engaged in consensual sex. What are they doing this for?” he wondered.

These are the questions many experts and the entire Serbian society are demanding an answer to.